• Clinical Care OptionsNew for GAPNA members: Clinical Care Options

    GAPNA has partnered with a Clinical Care Options to offer an ongoing series of free CNE programs available to GAPNA members. "Vaccinations and Healthy Aging: Protecting Your Older Patients From Shingles" is the latest program offered.

    In this live webinar, expert faculty expert faculty discuss how important it is to prevent shingles in older patients.

    Find out about it!

  • CoronaCoronavirus (COVID-19) Resources

    In an effort to support our members with the most updated information on COVID-19 we developed this resource page to easily access current CDC information and other resources to assist you professionally and personally.

    We will continue to update this page with more information as it becomes available and welcome your input as we navigate through this situation. As health care professionals it is our job to educate our patients and families on prevention and the what to do if someone is symptomatic.

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  • GAPNA 2020 National President Deborah Dunn, EdD, MSN, GNP-BC, ACNS-BC, GS-C interviews Dr. Ron Billano Ordona, DNP, FNP-BC about providing home-based primary care during COVID 19.

    "Facing Forward: Providing Home-based Primary Care during COVID 19"


    View the Video

Lonhala Magnair

Nursing Salaries

Men in Nursing Earn About $6,000 More Annually than Women

In a profession dominated by women, men in nursing earn more than $6,000 more a year than their female counterparts, according to a Nurse.com by OnCourse Learning survey of more than 4,500 U.S. nurses.

The Nursing Salary Research Report, which included registered nurses from all 50 states, showed men earn an average of $79,688 compared to $73,090 for women. Men make up almost 12% of the U.S. nursing workforce.

The fact that men earn higher salaries is something Brent MacWilliams, PhD, MSN, RN, APNP, APN-BC, president of the American Association for Men in Nursing, would like to see change.

“Traditionally, men have gravitated toward acute care, high-paid specialties and to management/administration, which are all higher paying,” he said. “Based on this survey, it seems clear men are being paid significantly more than women in the profession doing comparable work. I would call on employers to assess their current workforce for gender gaps and raise salaries to create parity.”

One important aspect of earnings is men are more likely to negotiate their salaries, the survey found. While 43% of men “most of the time or always” negotiate, only 34% of women do so.

Fifty percent of overall respondents said pursuing higher education, certification, or training to boost salary was a consideration or goal.

Attaining professional certifications is one way female nurses can close the salary gap.

Survey results showed men with specialty certifications had a salary only $1,252 higher than certified female nurses.

Additional findings in the survey include:

  • Millennials have the highest proportion of bachelor’s-prepared nurses (63%) among four generations surveyed.
  • Baby boomers have the highest percentage of professional certifications (43%).
  • The average one-way commute for nurses is 16 miles. The farthest nurses are willing to commute is 26 miles.

The survey has a 95% confidence interval and a 1.5% margin of error on its sample.

Plan your trip to the nation’s capital during GAPNA’s Annual Conference, September 26-29, 2018 by checking out all the things to do, places to eat, and ways to have fun.

Find out about it!