• 38th Annual GAPNA Conference

    October 3-5, 2019 at the Paris Hotel, Las Vegas, NV.

    Focused education; lasting connections, networking, free access to the GAPNA Online Library.

    Earn up to 21 contact hours (including pre-conference workshops).

    Get more information and register now!

  • 2019 Senior Report Senior Report: Older Americans have more options for home care, but still struggling.

    The United Health Foundation has released results of a sweeping new study benchmarking the health of older adults. The America's Health Rankings® Senior Report was created in partnership with GAPNA to improve the health of America's seniors.

    The data will help advanced practice nurses and other providers deliver quality care.

    Find out about it!

  • AwardNew for GAPNA members: MCM Education

    GAPNA has partnered with a MCM Education to offer an ongoing series of CNE programs available to GAPNA members. "Diagnosing and Managing Parkinson’s Disease in Older Adults," is the latest program offered.

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by both motor and nonmotor symptoms. It is diagnosed based on the presence of two of four motor symptoms including rest tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and gait imbalance...

    Find out about it!

  • FREE continuing education credit is available for the following session:

    "Dementia Management Update"

    (session captured at the GAPNA 2018 Annual Conference)


    For September/October 2019 - Get Your Free CNE Now!

Nursing Salaries

Men in Nursing Earn About $6,000 More Annually than Women

In a profession dominated by women, men in nursing earn more than $6,000 more a year than their female counterparts, according to a Nurse.com by OnCourse Learning survey of more than 4,500 U.S. nurses.

The Nursing Salary Research Report, which included registered nurses from all 50 states, showed men earn an average of $79,688 compared to $73,090 for women. Men make up almost 12% of the U.S. nursing workforce.

The fact that men earn higher salaries is something Brent MacWilliams, PhD, MSN, RN, APNP, APN-BC, president of the American Association for Men in Nursing, would like to see change.

“Traditionally, men have gravitated toward acute care, high-paid specialties and to management/administration, which are all higher paying,” he said. “Based on this survey, it seems clear men are being paid significantly more than women in the profession doing comparable work. I would call on employers to assess their current workforce for gender gaps and raise salaries to create parity.”

One important aspect of earnings is men are more likely to negotiate their salaries, the survey found. While 43% of men “most of the time or always” negotiate, only 34% of women do so.

Fifty percent of overall respondents said pursuing higher education, certification, or training to boost salary was a consideration or goal.

Attaining professional certifications is one way female nurses can close the salary gap.

Survey results showed men with specialty certifications had a salary only $1,252 higher than certified female nurses.

Additional findings in the survey include:

  • Millennials have the highest proportion of bachelor’s-prepared nurses (63%) among four generations surveyed.
  • Baby boomers have the highest percentage of professional certifications (43%).
  • The average one-way commute for nurses is 16 miles. The farthest nurses are willing to commute is 26 miles.

The survey has a 95% confidence interval and a 1.5% margin of error on its sample.

Plan your trip to the nation’s capital during GAPNA’s Annual Conference, September 26-29, 2018 by checking out all the things to do, places to eat, and ways to have fun.

Find out about it!