• GAPNA 2020 National President Deborah Dunn, EdD, MSN, GNP-BC, ACNS-BC, GS-C interviews Dr. Ron Billano Ordona, DNP, FNP-BC about providing home-based primary care during COVID 19.

    "Facing Forward: Providing Home-based Primary Care during COVID 19"


    View the Video

  • GAPNA 40th AnniversaryGAPNA’s anniversary theme “Preserve the Past, Enhance the Present, and Secure the Future,” reflects our shared vision for gerontological advanced practice nursing.

     

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  • GAPNA Exchange

       

    GAPNA Exchange is a private, secure community for members to share ideas, ask questions, lend expertise, and network with peers.

    It features both an Open Forum discussion area along with smaller, segmented communities.

    Interact with GAPNA members wherever and whenever!

    Go to GAPNA Exchange

  • CoronaCoronavirus (COVID-19) Resources

    In an effort to support our members with the most updated information on COVID-19 we developed this resource page to easily access current CDC information and other resources to assist you professionally and personally.

    We will continue to update this page with more information as it becomes available and welcome your input as we navigate through this situation. As health care professionals it is our job to educate our patients and families on prevention and the what to do if someone is symptomatic.

    View resources

     

Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA)

In 1987, President Ronald Reagan signed into law the first major revision of the federal standards for nursing home care since the 1965 creation of both Medicare and Medicaid 42 U.S.C1396r, 42 U.S.C. 1395i-3, 42 CFR 483. The landmark legislation changed society's legal expectations of nursing homes and their care.

Long term care facilities wanting Medicare or Medicaid funding are to provide services so that each resident can "attain and maintain her highest practicable physical, mental, and psycho-social well-being." The Federal Nursing Home Reform Act or OBRA '87 creates a set of national minimum set of standards of care and rights for people living in certified nursing facilities.

This landmark federal legislation comes by its common name "OBRA" through the legislative process. These minimum federal health and care requirements for nursing homes are to be delivered through variety of established protocols within nursing homes and regulatory agencies.

And as minimum standards, Long-Term Care Ombudsmen should view OBRA as a baseline that should be built upon to reach not only resident "well-being" but also happiness and fulfillment. National Long Term Care Ombudsman Resource Center Website, http://www.ltcombudsman.org/ombpublic/49_346_1023.cfm.

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