• 2020 GAPNA Pharmacology Conference: Contemporary Pharmacology and Prescribing in Older AdultsJoin us at the 2020 GAPNA Pharmacology Conference:
    Contemporary Pharmacology and Prescribing in Older Adults

    April 14-18, 2020, Honolulu, HI.

    Earn up to 18 CNE hours.

     

    Find out more about it and REGISTER today!

  • 2019 Senior Report Senior Report: Older Americans have more options for home care, but still struggling.

    The United Health Foundation has released results of a sweeping new study benchmarking the health of older adults. The America's Health Rankings® Senior Report was created in partnership with GAPNA to improve the health of America's seniors.

    The data will help advanced practice nurses and other providers deliver quality care.

    Find out about it!

  • AwardNew for GAPNA members: MCM Education

    GAPNA has partnered with a MCM Education to offer an ongoing series of CNE programs available to GAPNA members. "Diagnosing and Managing Parkinson’s Disease in Older Adults," is the latest program offered.

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by both motor and nonmotor symptoms. It is diagnosed based on the presence of two of four motor symptoms including rest tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and gait imbalance...

    Find out about it!

  • FREE continuing education credit is available for the following session:

    "Dementia Management Update"

    (session captured at the GAPNA 2018 Annual Conference)


    For September/October 2019 - Get Your Free CNE Now!

Studies Quantify Increase in Primary Care Services Provided by Nonphysicians

Nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) have increasingly provided primary care treatment services to Medicare patients over the past decade, according to recent studies:

A study by Xue et al. (2017) published in the Journal of Primary Care & Community Health, 8(4), 256-263, found primary care provided by physicians alone declined from 86% to 71% from 2008 to 2014. Meanwhile, shared care provided by physicians, NPs, or PAs increased from 12% to 23%. Care from NPs and PAs alone grew from 3% to 6%.

A study Loresto et al. (2017) in the Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, 29(6), 340-347, found a 170% increase in the number of Medicare patients receiving primary care from NPs alone from 2007 to 2013. Authors found no statistical difference in health status among patients treated by NPs alone as compared with physicians.

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