• CoronaCoronavirus (COVID-19) Resources

    In an effort to support our members with the most updated information on COVID-19 we developed this resource page to easily access current CDC information and other resources to assist you professionally and personally.

    We will continue to update this page with more information as it becomes available and welcome your input as we navigate through this situation. As health care professionals it is our job to educate our patients and families on prevention and the what to do if someone is symptomatic.

    View resources

     

  • AwardCall for Excellence Award Nominations

    The awards are: Emerging Chapter Award, Established Chapter Excellence Award, Special Interest Group Excellence Award, Excellence in Clinical Practice Award, Excellence in Community Service Award, Excellence in Education Award, Excellence in Leadership Award, and Excellence in Research Award.

    The nominations are tallied in July and the winners are announced every year during the Awards Celebration at the GAPNA Annual Conference.

    Now is the time to nominate a colleague or yourself - DEADLINE is June 1, 2020.

    Get started... nominate today!

  • Meet the Candidates for the 2020-2021 BOD!
    Voting begins May 4 - 29, 2020!

    Please take a moment to read about this year’s candidates and why they feel they should be chosen for the position noted.

    MEET THE CANDIDATES IN ADVANCE OF YOUR VOTE   >

Sleep Duration Related to Brain Structure and Cognitive Performance

Researchers at Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore found evidence that the less older adults sleep, the faster their brains age.

These findings pave the way for future work on sleep loss and its contribution to cognitive decline, including dementia.

The researchers examined the data of 66 older Chinese adults, from the Singapore-Longitudinal Aging Brain Study. Participants underwent structural MRI brain scans measuring brain volume and neuropsychological assessments testing cognitive function every two years.

Additionally, their sleep duration was recorded through a questionnaire. Those who slept fewer hours showed evidence of faster ventricle enlargement and decline in cognitive performance.

To learn more, see June et al. (2014). Sleep duration and age-related changes in brain structure and cognitive performance. SLEEP, 37(7).

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