• 38th Annual GAPNA Conference

    October 3-5, 2019 at the Paris Hotel, Las Vegas, NV.

    Focused education; lasting connections, networking, free access to the GAPNA Online Library.

    Earn up to 21 contact hours (including pre-conference workshops).

    Get more information and register now!

  • 2019 Senior Report Senior Report: Older Americans have more options for home care, but still struggling.

    The United Health Foundation has released results of a sweeping new study benchmarking the health of older adults. The America's Health Rankings® Senior Report was created in partnership with GAPNA to improve the health of America's seniors.

    The data will help advanced practice nurses and other providers deliver quality care.

    Find out about it!

  • AwardNew for GAPNA members: MCM Education

    GAPNA has partnered with a MCM Education to offer an ongoing series of CNE programs available to GAPNA members. "Diagnosing and Managing Parkinson’s Disease in Older Adults," is the latest program offered.

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by both motor and nonmotor symptoms. It is diagnosed based on the presence of two of four motor symptoms including rest tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and gait imbalance...

    Find out about it!

  • FREE continuing education credit is available for the following session:

    "Dementia Management Update"

    (session captured at the GAPNA 2018 Annual Conference)


    For September/October 2019 - Get Your Free CNE Now!

Contact Precautions Should Be Extended to All MRSA Carriers in a Nursing Home

A new study finds there can be substantial benefit when contact precautions are extended to all known methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriers in nursing homes, not just those with evident infection.

Researchers used a computational model that included virtual representations of 71 nursing homes and 29 hospitals to compare three strategies: not applying contact precautions to any nursing home residents, applying contact precautions to individuals with clinically apparent MRSA infections, and using contact precautions for all known MRSA carriers identified by hospital screening.

Implementing contact precautions for those with clinically apparent infection had a minimal effect of less than 1% on MRSA prevalence in hospitals, which continued 5 years after starting the practice. The strategy did result in a median 0.4% decrease in MRSA prevalence in nursing homes. Using contact precautions on all known MRSA carriers resulted in a 14.2% in MRSA prevalence in nursing homes and a 2.3% decrease in hospitals 1 year after implementation. 

According to the researchers, the findings support a more comprehensive approach to contain and prevent MRSA infection. They suggest that nursing homes include measures to help residents deal with the isolation requirement of contact precautions.

For more info, see Lee et al. (2013). The potential regional impact of contact precaution use in nursing homes to control methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, 34(2), 151-160. doi:10.1086/669091

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