• 2019 GAPNA Pharmacology Conference: Contemporary Pharmacology and Prescribing in Older AdultsJoin us at the 2019 GAPNA Pharmacology Conference:
    Contemporary Pharmacology and Prescribing in Older Adults

    March 28-30, 2019, Chicago Hilton, Chicago, IL.

    Earn up to 11.5 CNE hours.

     

    Find out more about it and REGISTER today!

  • Poster PresentationCALL FOR: Podium and Poster Abstracts

    For the 37th GAPNA Annual Conference
    at the Paris Hotel
    Las Vegas, Oct. 2-5, 2019

    GAPNA members are invited to submit an abstract about their innovative work, that should enrich the APRN's knowledge and/or enhance the care of an older adult.

    Submit by March 15, 2019!

  • W A N T E D   G A P N A   L E A D E R S!
    Call for Nominations!

    Have you ever considered stepping forward, accepting the challenge and volunteering for a position on the 2019 National Board of Directors? Register online NOW by April 1, 2019!

    Step Up - NOW is the Time! Register Here>

  • Gerontology Resources for APRNs in Acute and Emergent Care Settings ToolkitCareer Center

     
    NEW! The goal of the Gerontology Resources for APRNs in Acute and Emergent Care Settings (“Acute Care Resource Guide”) is to make geriatric and gerontological content easily accessible to those caring for older adults in higher acuity care settings.

    Learn more about the toolkit

  • FREE continuing education credit is available for the following session:

    "Diastolic Heart Failure Management"

    (session captured at the GAPNA 2017 Annual Conference)


    For Jan/Feb 2019 - Get Your Free CNE Now!

  • Poster PresentationONLINE NOW:

    2018 GAPNA Conference Poster Presentations

    Note the latest trends in the care, education, and research of the older adult population.

     

    View the 2018 Poster Presentations from the Annual Conference!

Clinical Pearl - Dementia

Mirrors as an Intervention in Dementia

by Linda J. Keilman

Older adults living with dementia can experience delusions and hallucinations which can be frightening.

When the situation is frightening, staff need to determine triggers to the fear and utilize nonpharmacologic strategies to remove or minimize the trigger(s).

The presence of mirrors can be soothing or lead to behavior issues. Decorative borders that are pleasing to the older adult can be placed around the edges of the mirror to decrease reflective space and outside light.

Removing the mirror is also an option; but if the individual enjoys using the mirror for grooming (especially in the bathroom), it should be encouraged as these individuals should be as independent as possible in their activities of daily living.

Getting the resident to choose a pleasing border can lead to success. Utilize a product that can be removed if the intervention is not successful.

Be sure to leave enough space so the older adult can see his or her entire face without obstruction.

Be sure to have family/staff document the response so providers know whether the intervention was successful!

Linda J. Keilman, DNP, GNP-BC
keilman@msu.edu